Goldie’s Lorikeet


Goldie’s Lorikeet 19 cm; 45–61 g. Black bill; crown red with a blackish line from loral area back to the hind crown,

Goldie's Lorikeet parrot

bluish under eye, deep pink hood from throat to nape with regular dark streaking which extends over yellowish-green mantle and undersides; upper back and tail green variably washed slightly brownish, wings and lower back dark green; yellow band across the underside of flight-feathers. Female has duller, less extensive red in the crown. Immature has a green crown.

Goldie’s Lorikeet Enjoys Some Scritches | How to Pet a Bird

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaqg7E88B0I

SOURCE: Love of Pets

Systematics History

Previously placed in Trichoglossus. Monotypic.

Subspecies

Monotypic.

Distribution

Highlands of New Guinea from Weyland Mts in W to the Huon Peninsula and Owen Stanley Range in E.

Habitat

Inhabits primary montane forest at mid-elevations, but ranging to sea-level and up to 2800 m were recorded in disturbed Nothofagus- Podocarpus forest.

Movement

Apparently nomadic in relation to flowering schedules of several canopy trees and lianas; for example, absent from an upland area of C Papua New Guinea, Dec–Jan, when known to be present in large numbers in a valley well to N.

Diet and Foraging

Flowers of ElaeocarpusPoikilospermumEucalyptusGrevillea, and Dimorphanthera; apparently no other certain sources, but psyllid lerps may be an important food that draws birds into casuarinas.

Dazzle the Goldie’s Lorikeet

SOURCE: Love of Pets

Sounds and Vocal Behavior

Not well documented. Calls include a high-pitched rising “tsleet!” and variations such as “tseet…tslew”, sounding not at all shrill or harsh.

Breeding

Sept-Oct. Nest in the base of dead fronds in the lower crown of the Pandanus tree, in one case at moss forest/grassland edge. Eggs two; in captivity incubation 23 days, nestling period 2 months.

Kiwi the Goldie’s Lorikeet | Rare Species

SOURCE: Love of Pets

Conservation Status

Not globally threatened. CITES II. Generally fairly scarce but locally common (e.g. near Tari Gap, Papua New Guinea), presumably in response to local food availability.


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Amanda