Prepuberty and its upheavals for parrot


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Prepuberty and its upheavals for parrot

About a few months ago, I experienced a special situation with Misha my blue and gold female of 2 years and 9 months. Indeed, I noticed that for a few days, she was more nervous than usual. Nothing scared him. Then, gradually, his state of nervousness quickly changed to that of anxiety, accompanied by obsessive behaviors. She no longer wanted to share our evening meals and constantly sought to isolate herself from the group. She no longer had pleasure in taking a shower, she for whom it is usually a party to frolic in the water.

This state of anxiety was becoming more and more pervasive. Everything she liked, everything that interested her was relegated to second place. She was constantly on high alert, her eyes wide with fear. In the evening, she made repetitive sounds as she walked up and down the top of the living room curtains. At another point, she would start flying around like there was someone chasing her. She was afraid of the other birds in the group, even the smallest ones, she who was so nice to all the friends. This state was more palpable at the end of the day. There was definitely something wrong with Misha, because I had a whole different bird in front of me.

Prepuberty and its upheavals for parrot

Of all, Misha is the happiest, the sweetest. It is not a bird that bites. It is my most reliable. I can let her explore the visit at will, because I know that she loves to go and hug their ears, that she will play in their hair while showing great delicacy. She is the sensual girl of the group. So, it was with great pain that I saw her metamorphose before my eyes. I tried to keep my calm so that she didn’t feel it and, by doing so, only made her condition worse.

I was then able to realize the extent of the consequences related to babies separated from their parents at a young age, hand-fed and weaned poorly and too quickly. Like many pre-pubertal birds, Misha was in a phase of questioning where she didn’t feel good about herself. She absolutely needed our intervention to regain her balance. It is often around this age that the negative effects of trauma experienced in the juvenile period appear. There were triggers such as the arrival of Fred ( blue-winged macaw ) in her environment and also the fact that I worked 3 days a week and that she had to stay in her cage during this time.

Prepuberty and its upheavals for parrot

When I was away, I could see when I returned that she had not touched her food or her water. His fruits and vegetables were intact. She had simply spent her day dozing in one place on her perch. Even if there hadn’t been any triggering events in Misha’s life, sooner or later the consequences of the trauma she experienced during her early period would have emerged; it was only a matter of time.

My sweet Misha needed to be secure in her surroundings. Even though in our human eyes nothing had changed dramatically, from her perspective it was different. When she isolated herself from the group during meals and refused to come and find us, then she had a whole scenario in her head which was not at all reality, but which for her was quite real. Even if it was her who made the decision to isolate herself, from her gaze, it was we who rejected her, who no longer wanted her. Same thing when she no longer wanted to take a shower or do any other activity that she usually liked to do. It was she who had withdrawn from the activity, but she honestly believed that it was us who had excluded her. She was deeply unhappy and miserable in her dark thoughts and she couldn’t get herself out of this state on her own. She absolutely needed us to make it happen.

Prepuberty and its upheavals for parrot

First, we had to be able to secure it in its environment. Above all, not to change her routine, not to listen to her when she refused to do the activities that we used to do. For example, if she didn’t want to take a shower, you had to give it to her anyway and talk to her throughout to reassure her. If we stop showering her because she doesn’t want to, then she will understand that “we don’t shower her because we don’t like her, that she isn’t worth it”. She won’t make the connection that it was she who didn’t want to. If she isolates herself during supper, bring her back to the table to force her to stay with us. The important thing is that she does not fall into her dark thoughts and that she feels alone and miserable.

To compensate for the fact that Misha refused to eat while I was away from work, I put her meals as close as possible to the perch on which she tended to spend her day. In addition, I put stockings near her in which I inserted surprises ( walnuts, almonds, small boxes of raisins, etc. ).

Prepuberty and its upheavals for parrot

Also give her a shower before leaving the house, so that she spends a good part of the morning grooming herself, so that the day would seem shorter to her. At this level, there has been a good improvement, but she continues to eat very little when I leave the house and she finds herself in her cage. I prefer to limit the moments when she has to experience this.

Still, after about 5 days things started to improve. The anxiety episodes began to diminish and finally disappeared completely. Misha has regained her taste for life and regained all her joie de vivre. I also began to see Fred my blue-winged macaw in a different way. He too experienced a lot of upheaval in his youth. In fact, all hand-fed birds experience this kind of heartbreak to varying degrees. Sooner or later, they will experience the repercussions in their own way, according to their temperament.

What about birds that no one understands for lack of knowledge and competent resources in their environment? Poor little ones! With the large number of hand-fed birds in the market, there is cause for concern for the fate of these poor birds who more often than not end up being abandoned because they end up expressing their unhappiness. .

 


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Amanda