Blue-crowned Lorikeet


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Blue-crowned Lorikeet 19 cm; 47–52 g. Orange bill, grass-green forehead backed by pale bright purplish-blue mid-to

Blue-crowned Lorikeet

the hind crown with slightly elongate feathers; patch from lores and below the eye to

Blue-crowned Lorikeets

upper breast red; rest of body green except for a red belly patch that shades purple between and onto thighs, the underside of tail yellowish, legs orange.

Blue crowned Lorikeets

Immature has less color on the undersides.

Blue crowned Lorikeet

Systematics History

Monotypic.

Subspecies

Monotypic.

Distribution

Wallis and Futuna Are, E Fiji (S Lau Archipelago), Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga, and Niue.

Habitat

Forest, scrub, gardens and plantations, wherever flowering trees are present; commoner or more easily detected in cultivated areas than in the forest, but much rarer in the cleared forest or urban land.

Movement

Birds are highly mobile, moving about within islands in search of foods as they become available, and apparently a well-known inter-island nomad.

Diet and Foraging

Nectar, pollen, and soft fruit, with a preference for coconut, mango, ErythrinaElaeocarpus angustifolius and Calophyllum inophyllum. However, on Niuafo’ou flowering Casuarina is a key food source, others being Sterculia fanaihoKleinhovia hospitalMusa paradisiacaAlphitonia ziziphoidesPueraria lobataBarringtonia AsiaticaHibiscus tiliaceus, and Pometia pinnata; elsewhere flowers of thatching palm Metroxylon noted.

Lorikeet blue crowned

The use of unripe mangoes and flowers of a woody weed Stachyrtarpheta urticifolia was probably the result of food shortage following a hurricane.

Blue-crowned Lorikeet

SOURCE:obirds

Sounds and Vocal Behavior

Commonest vocalization a rather pure, high-pitched whistle, “seee!”, drawn-out and either even-pitched or upslurred, given both in flight and when perched. Also somewhat more complex, squeaky high-pitched notes.

Breeding

Possibly throughout the year as records are for Mar, Jun, Aug & Dec (nestlings). Nest a hole in a tree, once a Hibiscus; records of using holes in earth banks probably involved takeovers of old kingfisher nests. Eggs 1–2; incubation in captivity 23 days.

LORI FRINGILLAIRE – BLUE-CROWNED LORIKEET – VINI AUSTRALIS

SOURCE:LES OISEAUX DU FAUCIGNY

Conservation Status

Not globally threatened. CITES II. A BirdLife “restricted-range” species. Common throughout much of range, including Lau Archipelago, Samoa, and Futuna, with numbers estimated between several 100s and several 1000s; but on Wallis, extinct for unknown reasons, though probably due to black rats (Rattus rattus).

Declining in Tonga, but abundant on Niuafo’ou (several thousand pairs) and, by 1974 report, Niuatoputapu, while uncommon on Late, probably owing to the scarcity of flowering trees. A population of around 60 survives on ‘Eue’iki in the Tongatapu group, 1990, were isolated for probably 100 years.

The extinction of the species on ‘Eua occurred within 50 years of the island’s colonization by R. Rattus. The steady spread of the Jungle Myna (Acridotheres fuscus) through the Fijian, Tongan, and Samoan archipelagos is viewed with concern, given its aggressive ability to compete for nest-holes.


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