Golden-winged Parakeet


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Golden winged ParakeetThe Golden-winged Parakeet is the northeasternmost representative of the genus Brotogeris and is sometimes considered to form a superspecies with the Cobalt-winged Parakeet (Brotogeris cyanoptera) of upper Amazonia, and the Orange-chinned Parakeet (Brotogeris jugularis) of Middle America and northwest South America.
The present species ranges from south and central Amazonian Brazil east along the Amazon itself and north over the Guianas to northeast Venezuela, and the species inhabits primary lowland forest, second growth, and other wooded habitats, including large cities, provided there are sufficient trees.
The Golden-winged Parakeet has been recorded to 1200 m north of the Orinoco in Venezuela, where the species has been recorded in the cloud forest.At rest, the Golden-winged Parakeet appears like a more or less uniform psittacine, with a relatively long tail, but upon taking the flight the bright yellow-orange primary coverts are immediately apparent (although these are lacking in immatures).Some five subspecies are currently recognized, and these chiefly differ in their wing and tail patterns, as well as in the presence and color of the frontal band and chin spot.

Golden-winged Parakeet 16 cm; 47–80 g. Close to B. cyanoptera but primary-coverts bright orange, chin spot orange-brown, blue in flight-feathers greatly reduced; has a brownish frontal band. Immatures lack orange in the wing.

Golden-winged Parakeet

 Golden-winged Parakeet

Race tuipara has a frontal band and chin spot orange, yellow edging to outer tail-feathers; Chrysostom larger, with yellowish-orange forehead and yellow primary-coverts; solimoensis like cyanoptera but the frontal band and chin paler; tensions like tuipara but with no frontal band.

Systematics History

Editor’s Note: This article requires further editing work to merge existing content into the appropriate Subspecies sections. Please bear with us while this update takes place.

DNA study indicates that present species and B. cyanoptera are sister species, the two, in turn, being sister to the pair B. pyrrhoptera and B. jugularis.

Race solimoensis sometimes included within nominate. Five subspecies are currently recognized.

SOURCE: Video Ark

Subspecies

SUBSPECIES

Brotogeris chrysoptera chrysoptera Scientific name definitions

Distribution

NE Venezuela SE through the Guianas to CN Brazil (Roraima E to Amapá).
SUBSPECIES

Brotogeris chrysoptera tenuifrons Scientific name definitions

Distribution

upper R Negro, in NW Brazil.
SUBSPECIES

Brotogeris chrysoptera solimoensis Scientific name definitions

Distribution

middle Amazon from Codajás to Manaus (NC Brazil).
SUBSPECIES

Brotogeris chrysoptera tuipara Scientific name definitions

Distribution

S of Amazon from R Tapajós E to Maranhão (NC Brazil).
SUBSPECIES

Brotogeris chrysoptera chrysosema Scientific name definitions

Distribution

R Madeira and tributaries S to N Mato Grosso, in W Brazil.

Distribution

Editor’s Note: Additional distribution information for this taxon can be found in the ‘Subspecies’ article above. In the future, we will develop a range-wide distribution article.

Golden-winged Parrot

Golden-winged Parakeet

Habitat

Cloud forest to 1200 m N of Orinoco, elsewhere lowland primary rain forest, second-growth along waterways, savanna, coastal sand-ridge woodland, edges, and centers of towns in large trees.

Movement

Some irregular wandering was suggested by records near Paramaribo, Surinam, in Jul–Aug and Oct 1964 in contrast to other years.

Diet and Foraging

Largely concentrates on flowers, taking nectar of e.g. NorantheaInga later foliaErythrina amazonicaVirola surinamensisTabebuia serratifoliaPithecellobium pedicellateBertholletia excelsaAllantonia lineate, and possibly Micropholis melinoneana;

also the green seed of Cecropia miparia, the seed of Alibutia edulis and Bombacaceae, seed and pulp of Ficus and Sterculia excelsa, the fruit of the palm Astrocaryum, berries of Trema micrantha, and surface algae, insects, and snails in pools.

Sounds and Vocal Behavior

Common calls include a high-pitched “klee”, shrill “chree” or bisyllabic “chree-chree”, given both in flight and perched. Also a fast chattering series “cra-cra-cra-cra-cra”. Noisy in flight, individuals of a group often call simultaneously. Large groups can make a loud cacophonous noise.

SOURCE: shihan Birds World

Breeding

Occupied nest-holes in Feb, Apr, Sept and Nov in Surinam; Apr, Jul–Aug, and Nov in French Guiana, where numerous flying young observed in May; Sept-Oct and possibly Apr–May in N Mato Grosso. Uses tree-holes and arboreal termitaria. Eggs 3–4. No further information.

Conservation Status

Not globally threatened. CITES II. Locally common to abundant, even in cities, in all range states, and is relatively little traded. There have been some local declines in E of range from habitat loss.


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