Parrot facts for kids


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Parrot facts for kids

Parrot facts for kids, The roles and functions of pets in the emotional, relational, social, and intellectual lives of humans are particularly clear when you consider their interactions with the child.

Indeed, if we examine these in the light of experimental research, longitudinal studies, and “clinical observations”, they shed incomparable light on the mechanisms and processes that shape individual development, attachment phenomena, and behaviors. and cognitive processes in humans.

If we base ourselves on the words of the children, by sharing the habitat, the “ecological niche” and the intimacy of humans, the pet is considered both as a friend who is part of the family, a confidant who can see and hear everything, an accomplice who does not betray and who can be trusted blindly.

He does not speak and therefore does not judge, and does not refer to personal and family difficulties: without counting the “services” that he can render to people and society.

 

Interesting Information & Facts about Parrot for Kids

The child and the parrot

In everyday life, pets have the possibility and the capacity to spontaneously manifest new, nuanced, strange, complex, and diversified behaviors, both in their specific register and in the registers learned and shaped in contact with humans.

Their ability to decode human signals and adjust to their behavior, as well as their flexibility, generate the feeling, or the certainty, that they match emotions and effects (for the precise definition of tuning or ” attunement ”, see Stern, 1985).

Children of all ages can thus form the most surprising representations and ideas, carry out the most delusional transfers, reconstruct their reasoning, and develop new projects. Interactions with the pet, therefore, help to shape their emotional, emotional, relational, social, and cognitive world.

5 Pet Birds Great for Kids

SOURCE:MARLENE MC’COHEN

Are parrots good pets

Parrots can be admitted as family and family partners when they are able to reproduce environmental noises, musical tunes, vocalizations, onomatopoeias, and words of humans, and especially when they seem to imitate them, that is, to give them the same meaning and the same meaning in the same contexts and situations.

How the parrot animal contributes to the emotional security of the child

Relationships with monkeys will not be covered in the … helps to reveal how different levels of the child’s brain function can be unlocked, activated, organized, and regulated. (For other animals, some of which may become familiar, for example, goats and rabbits, see Montagner, 2002b).

Combined with research on the child’s relationship systems with the mother and other family partners, with peers and “outside” people, it helps to give full meaning to his individual development, to his attachment processes, to his behavior and his intellectual functioning, and thus, paradoxically, to reconcile different theories of human development.

Many situations experienced with animals have anxiolytic and soothing effects on humans. For example, there is a significant drop in heart rate and blood pressure in a child who strokes a parrot (and also in humans of all ages who watch fish evolve in an aquarium: Friedman et al., 1983; Katcher et al., 1983).

In addition, if we measure behavioral indicators during interactions between a child and his parrot, the rough or aggressive behavior of the child has a low probability of causing, in animals, threats or aggressions, and thus inducing or reinforcing the emotional insecurity of the child himself and of human partners:

in the vast majority of cases, the parrot reacts by bodily avoidance or flight (Filiatre et al., 1986, 1988; Millot et al., 1988, 1989).

More fundamentally, the measurement of behavioral indicators from films shows that interactions with a familiar parrot help to reduce emotional insecurity in most children.

This is what we caricaturally observe in worried, anxious, or anxious children who cannot overcome or put their fears into perspective when they have lived or are experiencing destabilizing situations or events, especially if their human partners are insecure or if the environment is threatening.

The emotional security that sets in and develops during relationships with the parrot is mainly expressed by appeasement and reassurance (crying, groans, or tremors fade), attenuation, or extinction of behavior. avoidance, fear, and flight, increasing the frequency of affiliative behaviors (smiles, laughs, caresses, jubilations, offerings, and solicitations). But we also note the attenuation or non-manifestation of so-called hyperactive behaviors (Bouvard, 2002) and aggressive behaviors.

At the same time, the child unlocks his “inner world” (he speaks and confides in the animal: language then plays its full role in the expression of emotions and thought, and in the communication).

This is also what is observed in disabled children or in psychotics, autists, or with “cerebral palsy” who regularly find a parrot, even if the reassuring effects are less legible (Condorcet, 1973; Levinson, 1969, 1985; Vernay, 2003).

Children also have a high probability of unlocking their inner world and settling on the slope of emotional security as soon as they perceive a possibility of tuning with a cat, a horse (Pelletier-Milet, 2004) dolphin, or a talking parrot (this is obviously rarer), but also with other animals – rabbits, guinea pigs, goats (Montagner, 2002b).

The reduction of emotional insecurity during interactions with a pet is particularly evident in children who have not made an attachment (Bowlby, 1969-1980) “secure” with their mother, father, or another human partner. (Ainsworth 1974, 1978; Pierrehumbert, 2003, Montagner, 2002a, 2006).

Consequently, the daily relationship with a partner who does not judge, who does not refer to personal or family difficulties, who does not betray, and whose behavioral manifestations are soothing and reassuring (see below), can settle or comfort children. on the emotional security side.

Especially when this process is slowed down, prevented, or thwarted by an “unsafe” attachment with the family partner (s) (abused child; a child whose mother is anxious or depressed; parent (s) suffering from personality disorders; breast breaks family, unemployed parent (s), etc.).

How the animal parrots stimulate the emotional and relational development of the child

Once emotional security is installed and the inner world is unlocked, the child can get out of their blockages and inhibitions.

He can release the whole range of his emotions and skills. Regarding emotions, it reveals them without restraint at the same time as it structures them: it tells the animal its joys, fears, anger, sadness, surprises, or disgust (the six emotions considered innate and universal).

He also reveals his effects (worries, anxieties, frustrations, jealousies, friendships …). At the same time, during proximal interactions, he perceives the animal’s internal states which he interprets as emotions or effects comparable to what he feels.

The release of emotions and effects is accompanied by the release of “basic” skills which underpin the emotional, relational, and social development of the child, but also his cognitive development (see below). Five major skills (or core skills) have been defined and formalized (Montagner, 1995-2006).

Parrot Follows Her Favorite Kid Everywhere

SOURCE:The Dodo

Sustained visual attention

This basic skill defines the baby’s capacity, more generally of children of all ages, to steadily look at a “target”, that is to say in a non-fleeting manner, not limited to visual scans, and not interrupted by external events.

It is manifest in babies a few days or weeks old (depending on the child) during eye-to-eye interactions with their mother. It is more and more marked and lasting as the mother anchors her relationship with the baby in “capturing” and controlling her gaze (see Montagner, 2006).

Most children are fascinated or confused by what they think they see in the animal’s eyes. On their stomachs, sitting, or on their knees, they look for proximal “eye to eye” interactions.

The installation, development, and strengthening of their sustained visual attention is facilitated by the “meeting” with the sustained visual attention that also presents pets.

 

Dogs are in constant search of the human gaze. They continuously initiate and accept renewed and long-lasting “eye to eye” interactions.

Familiar dogs thus provide the child with a framework of a priori reassuring and structuring landmarks: the child does not then exhibit behaviors and does not make comments that can be interpreted as the expression of insecurity or malaise.

Having a long “eye to eye” interaction with his familiar dog, he has time to give meaning and meaning to his behaviors and to adjust to them, interpret his emotional states and affective, and agree to them (if it forms the idea that the animal has emotions and affects comparable or identical to what it feels).

The child liberates at the same time his other basic skills (see below) and his language productions. The observations in the kindergarten and elementary school classes show that when children said to be failing school have the opportunity to experience eye-to-eye interactions with the teacher’s dog,

the frequency and duration of their self-centered behavior, fear, avoidance, “hyperactivity” and aggression are then significantly reduced (Montagner, 1995b, 2002b).

Familiar or becoming familiar dogs can thus be “agents” likely to play a significant role in the development of processes related to sustained visual attention and which could not be structured in a child at home, at school, or elsewhere, as part of its relationships with humans.

In particular: multi-channel communication, reading the emotions and effects of a partner who accepts proximal interactions, joint visual attention, tuning of emotions, and “secure” attachment.

Cats also obviously have a capacity for sustained visual attention, but only at certain times, in certain contexts, and in certain situations (Montagner, 2002b).

Likewise, horses have a capacity for sustained visual attention, in particular when they are “eye to eye” with a human, but the lateralization of the eyes, size, body mass, anatomical features (nostrils and mouth impressive, hooves) and the extent of their behaviors limit eye-to-eye contact and proximal interactions, especially when it comes to children.

Dolphins also appear to have an inexhaustible ability to initiate and accept eye-to-eye interactions with humans (thus interpreted) and then to develop sustained visual attention.

In addition, the peculiarities and richness of their “vocal” repertoire give the feeling that they are in dialogue. This animal can therefore also play a role in some of the constructions previously reported and linked to sustained visual attention.

As for parrots, certain species create situations that lead to renewed and lasting eye-to-eye contact with humans, and thus to sustained visual attention. But, as in cats, these behaviors are episodic and variable depending on the context and the situation.

The sustained visual attention of parrots is closely linked to skills that most other animals do not have: the ability to reproduce sounds, sounds, musical themes, vocalizations of animals, and language productions, that of having air to give them the same meaning and the same meaning as humans, that is to say, to imitate them (this is interpreted: see below).

Through their “vocal” and “linguistic” productions, their gaze that is both mobile and immobile, which seems to “dissect” the environment and people, and the sustained visual attention they give them, parrots gather around them the different family members and visitors.

By creating situations of joint visual attention through their “imitations” and by making “those around them” speak, they stimulate affiliative behaviors (see below), communication and dialogue.

Dogs are in constant search of the human gaze. They continuously initiate and accept renewed and long-lasting “eye to eye” interactions.

Familiar dogs thus provide the child with a framework of a priori reassuring and structuring landmarks: the child does not then exhibit behaviors and does not make comments that can be interpreted as the expression of insecurity or malaise.

Having a long “eye to eye” interaction with his familiar dog, he has time to give meaning and meaning to his behaviors and to adjust to them, interpret his emotional states and affective, and agree to them (if it forms the idea that the animal has emotions and affects comparable or identical to what it feels). The child liberates at the same time his other basic skills (see below) and his language productions.

The observations in the kindergarten and elementary school classes show that when children said to be failing school have the opportunity to experience eye-to-eye interactions with the teacher’s dog, the frequency and duration of their self-centered behavior, fear, avoidance, “hyperactivity” and aggression are then significantly reduced (Montagner, 1995b, 2002b).

Familiar or becoming familiar dogs can thus be “agents” likely to play a significant role in the development of processes related to sustained visual attention and which could not be structured in a child at home, at school, or elsewhere, as part of its relationships with humans.

In particular: multi-channel communication, reading the emotions and effects of a partner who accepts proximal interactions, joint visual attention, tuning of emotions, and “secure” attachment.

Cats also obviously have a capacity for sustained visual attention, but only at certain times, in certain contexts, and in certain situations (Montagner, 2002b).

Likewise, horses have a capacity for sustained visual attention, in particular when they are “eye to eye” with a human, but the lateralization of the eyes, size, body mass, anatomical features (nostrils and mouth impressive, hooves) and the extent of their behaviors limit eye-to-eye contact and proximal interactions, especially when it comes to children.

Dolphins also appear to have an inexhaustible ability to initiate and accept eye-to-eye interactions with humans (thus interpreted) and then to develop sustained visual attention.

In addition, the peculiarities and richness of their “vocal” repertoire give the feeling that they are in dialogue. This animal can therefore also play a role in some of the constructions previously reported and linked to sustained visual attention.

As for parrots, certain species create situations that lead to renewed and lasting eye-to-eye contact with humans, and thus to sustained visual attention. But, as in cats, these behaviors are episodic and variable depending on the context and the situation.

The sustained visual atten